Sly and Robbie meet Dubmatix

In reggae, all roads lead to the “Riddim Twins”, Sly & Robbie. They’ve been revered as style-defining icons for years, and together and individually have a massive influence on the genre. Now, Sly & Robbie meet Dubmatix. The Canadian producer and multi-instrumentalist took original Sly & Robbie tracks and spent months crafting this new album, Overdubbed. The result is an album that shines with eclectic diversity. From roots oriented tunes to dubs for the clubs, there’s a bit of everything. Dubmatix’s refreshingly playful, bass-heavy approach creates new highlights while at the same time paying deserved homage to two world-class musicians.

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Bunny “Striker” Lee interview – Part 2 [UNCUT]

Following the wonderfully named 2103 documentary “I Am the Gorgon”, Bunny “Striker” Lee is becoming more widely recognized as one of the crucial figures in the development of Jamaican music. His encyclopaedic knowledge and forthright nature make for a fascinating interview, with frequent digressions and anecdotes only adding flavour to the mix. In part two of a wide-ranging conversation, he holds forth on, among many others: the “revolutionary” Mrs. Pottinger, Coxsone Dodd, Chris Blackwell, Black Uhuru, Sly & Robbie, Lee Perry, Count Shelly, interviewer Steve Barrow, Inner Circle, , Joe Gibbs, Edward Seaga, Irie FM, Rodigan, Roland Alphonso, Tommy McCook, and Lester Sterling. And there’s more: Harry J’s “midas touch”, England “the headquarters” of Jamaican music, King Tubby’s 4-track dub, when Niney “ruled the roost”, Duke Reid’s guns, and the importance of Baba Brooks.

Bunny “Striker” Lee interview – Part 1 [UNCUT]

One of Jamaica’s most prolific and influential producers, Bunny Lee is well placed to takes us through the history of Jamaican music, from the early days of Tom the Great Sebastian, to the Vere Johns talent show, and the emergence of ska. He recalls his days as a radio plugger in the “dodgy business” of music and his peak producing years between 1969 and 1975, when he had a series of hits with the likes of Slim Smith and Delroy Wilson. Along the way are fascinating comments on such seminal figures as Leslie Kong, King Tubby, and U Roy. And then things get really interesting, as he explains to Steve Barrow and Don Letts how Derrick Morgan gave Bob Marley his break, the significance of Big Youth’s dreadlocks, his “Dreadlocks Dread”, and the “John Crow Skank”. All this is followed by an extended, extraordinary diatribe about how Byron Lee “tried to kill reggae”.

Lee Scratch Perry’s Vision of Paradise

Filmed over 15 years, this is the story of the legendary Lee Scratch Perry, the inventor of Reggae and Dub, and a guide how to change the world with art and music. A thrilling, poetic story with the legendary Lee Scratch Perry, this movie is a unique project in many ways: it’s not a biography but rather a fairy tale documentary! The director followed Lee Perry for 15 years and discovered a story that is almost impossible to believe: a revelation, told about and with one of the major protagonists of contemporary music. It is a mind-blowing encounter with “the” inventor of reggae and dub, the mentor of Bob Marley and as such one of the most influential musicians of the 20th century. The movie is a humorous adventure of epic dimensions and can be seen as a guide for how to change the world with music – with a positive attitude, mind set or, as Lee Perry calls it: “vibration”.

Bunny “Striker” Lee interview – Part 1

One of Jamaica’s most prolific and influential producers, Bunny Lee is well placed to takes us through the history of Jamaican music, from the early days of Tom the Great Sebastian, to the Vere Johns talent show, and the emergence of ska. He recalls his days as a radio plugger in the “dodgy business” of music and his peak producing years between 1969 and 1975, when he had a series of hits with the likes of Slim Smith and Delroy Wilson. Along the way are fascinating comments on such seminal figures as Leslie Kong, King Tubby, and U Roy. And then things get really interesting, as he explains to Steve Barrow and Don Letts how Derrick Morgan gave Bob Marley his break, the significance of Big Youth’s dreadlocks, his “Dreadlocks Dread”, and the “John Crow Skank”. All this is followed by an extended, extraordinary diatribe about how Byron Lee “tried to kill reggae”.

Paul “Groucho” Smykle

An interview from Red Bull Music academy daily with Paul “Groucho” Smykle. Click here for full article.

Very much a behind the scenes figure, Paul ‘Groucho’ Smykle mixed some of the most intense dub works to be released during the ’80s and ’90s. As one of Island Records’ in-house engineers, dubmaster Groucho etched his mark on prime works by Black Uhuru, Sly and Robbie and Ini Kamoze, and was probably the first mixer to subject African music to the extreme sonic textures of dub.